Category Archive: RFC Show Notes

Sep 05 2014

Resonant Frequency Episode 54 Show Notes

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Intro: We’re back and here is the stuff Donations and the impotence of donations

    • Donations
      • Paul
      • Shane
      • Christopher
      • Robert
  • You can make donations via credit card, check or bank draft an kb5jbv@gmail.com at Paypal.com
  • You can also help the show by using our Amazon.com links on the website for your online purchases. They credit us 4% of the total sale and that helps us get hardware and other things we need for the show. Go to the website at http://rfpodcast.info/Podcast and click on one of the Amazon adds.
  • First Complaint about the music so we know we are back on the air. If folks are complaining about the music we know folks are listening to us.
  • We are still looking for someone to help out with show notes.
  • Still looking for a few willing YL’s to help with some voice over stuff on the show. Don’t be scared. Its just talking on the radio. You don’t need any special equipment to help. Send me an email at resonantfrequencypodcast@gmail.com and I will help you get started.

Segment 1

  • We talk about SWR (Standing Wave Ratio)

 

 

 

 

Segment 2

Lee DeForest the self proclaimed Father of modern radio.

220px-Lee_De_Forest

    • Developed the Audion or Triode Vacuum
    • 180 patents to his credit
    • The DeForest Valve ( Audion ) invented in 1906
    • Self proclaimed “Father of Modern Radio”
    • Founding member of Institute of Radio Engineers
    • Dr. Herman DeVry named his School “The Deforest Training School” today we know it as “DeVry University”
    • Invented one of the Technologies that brought sound to motion pictures
    • The Audion dominated electronics for over 40 years
    • Jammed Marconi’s broadcast at a yacht race
    • Involved in many patent disputes
    • indicted for mail fraud

 

Closing

  • Working to get some of the show segments to make the stand alone with no music.

 

Credits

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Aug 01 2014

Resonant Frequency Show Notes Episode 053

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Intro:

We’re back and here is the stuff

Donations and the impotence of donations

  • Donations
    • William Hyatt
    • Bruce Given VE2GZI
    • Bill McGinnis KJ4KNI (Second all time highest single donation)
  • You can make donations via credit card, check or bank draft an kb5jbv@gmail.com at Paypal.com
  • You can also help the show by using our Amazon.com links on the website for your online purchases. They credit us 4% of the total sale and that helps us get hardware and other things we need for the show. Go to the website at http://rfpodcast.info/Podcast and click on one of the Amazon adds.

Wow, to my surprise the Hams have abandoned VHF and UHF here in DFW since I have been gone.

 

Thanks to the dumb as a rock Hams on the only repeater that have activity.

 

Format changes.

 

Thanks for all the well wishes via feedback

  • Feedback
    • Shane Ball KD7JWC
    • William K5WCF
    • Bill KE5BGU
    • David W5DMW

Still need help with show notes

 

Need YL’s to help with some voice over stuff on the show. Don’t be scared. Its just talking on the radio.

 

 Segment 1

  • We talk about Clinton B. Desoto and 200 meters and down
    • Available at Amazon.com

 

 

Segment 2

 

Reviewing the Baofeng UV5R V2

  • We purchased our Radio on Ebay.com
  • The Baofeng radios are also available at Amazon. com (we prefer you do this one so the show gets a little credit)
  • We found a lot of useful information and help at Miklor.com
  • The best programming software for the job was Chirp by Dan KK7DS

 

 

Closing

 

Credits

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Apr 18 2011

RFC Show Notes Episode 052

00:00 Opening Theme “Hand-Picked” by John Williams, from the album “Long Ride Home”
01:00 Introduction Due to the high volume of feedback, we’ll cover that in a future episode. 

The Resonant Frequency website has been updated, and the donation counter reset, but all donations are gratefully accepted. If an episode has helped you at all, it should be worth a dollar. Thanks.

While there, please click through the ads for your purchases at Amazon or GoDaddy.

Visit the website often to see the latest articles and videos. Check out the Linux in the Ham Shack site, too.

Spring is here and storms are a frequent occurrence. Check out your local Skywarn group.

08:13 Song “Ain’t No Way” by Kirk Fletcher, from the album “My Turn”.
11:08 Topic Part 2 of the Mobile Installation series. This time, we’ll discuss routing power to the radio.
Wire gauge numbers decrease as the diameter of the wire increases. For example, #12 is smaller than #10. For mobile radio installations, bigger wire is better.
In general, stranded will be better than solid for this purpose. It is more flexible and less likely to fatigue and break as it moves.
Consider the voltage, current demand, and distance when choosing the power cable. One symptom of using too small a power wire is a “motor boat” sound on your transmission. The voltage will drop with distance, and that drop is greater on smaller wire than larger wire for the same distance.
Here’s a wire table to help choose the appropriate wire size for your installation.
An example might be:
A 100W HF radio that draws 20 amps, and a 50W dual-band VHF/UHF radio that draws 8.5 amps. The radios will both be 8 feet from the battery. Using the table above,
we can see that #8 wire will deliver up to 30 amps at 15 feet, so it would certainly do the job. It’s best to be a bit conservative. Since our run is only 8 feet, we might get by with #10.
If we were to run separate power leads to both radios, then #10 would certainly work for the HF rig, and #12 for the VHF/UFH radio. -Ed.
Most installations will use the nominal 12VDC power directly from the vehicle battery. It’s best to avoid plugging into the 12V accessory outlet (cigarette lighter) or under-dash fuse panel.
Examine the engine compartment carefully to determine the best route for the power wires. Avoid running the wire directly over the engine or exhaust manifold, as these get very hot and can melt the insulation.
Fasten the wires using cable ties, Velcro wraps, or spiral wrap suitable for vehicle use.
There will be access ports in the firewall to pass the cable into the passenger compartment. Some may have a rubber plug that you can pierce to pass the wire through. If you must drill through the metal firewall, use a grommet or other insulator to protect the wire from the sharp edges.
You may find cavities in the fenders and doors that will accept the power cable. Remember that the wire will vibrate and rub against surfaces and possibly wear through the insulation and cause a short, so take precautions.
Use standard connectors whenever possible, such as a Jones or Cinch plug, Molex, Anderson PowerPole or the like. (Note, PowerWerx.com is a good source for many of these. -Ed.)
Some prefer to solder the leads and shrink wrap or tape the connection.
If possible, crimp/solder ring lugs to the wires and attach them to the battery using the battery cable clamp screws.
Remember to fuse both the positive and negative leads! It’s best to have fuses at the battery AND at the radio ends.
Because the recommended wire is stranded, it can wick moisture into the cable and cause corrosion. Soldering the connection helps prevent this, as does electrical tape, heat shrink tubing, or liquid electrical tape.
Periodically inspect the wires in the engine compartment to catch potential problems early.
36:15 Song “Pearl River” by Mike Zito, from the album “Pearl River”.
41:05 Conclusion Next time, an all-feedback episode.
Check out the website, read the articles, leave a comment, look for a new video, make a donation to the podcast, use GoDaddy for your web hosting, and click the Amazon link for your purchases. Send your feedback! Check out Linux in the Ham Shack, too.
The hamfest season is upon us: Ham-Com, Ham Radio in the Park, and various hamfests. 

Email Richard at kb5jbv@gmail.com
Twitter: twitter.com/kb5jbv
Identica: http://identi.ca/kb5jbv
Friendfeed: http://friendfeed.com/kb5jbv
KB5JBV on D-Star via the NT5RN repeater.
Fan pages at Facebook for Resonant Frequency and Linux in the Ham Shack.

Closing theme “We Gotta Go” by David Henderson at Podsafe Audio.
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Mar 12 2011

RFC Show Notes Episode 051

00:00 Opening Theme “Hand-Picked” by John Williams, from the album “Long Ride Home”
01:01 Introduction Look for the next installment of the mobile installation discussion, and feedback, in the next episode. 

Richard asked several local amateur radio clubs for copies of their newsletters in order to develop ideas for future podcast episodes. One of them, The Tyler Amateur Radio Club of Tyler, TX, sent Richard a copy of their newsletter, The Groundwire. An article in that issue provides the topic for this show.

03:40 Topic “Studying to the test.” That is, simply memorizing the correct answers to the questions without actually understanding the concepts.
This is not a new phenomenon. Prospective hams have been doing this to some extent for a very long time. Many hams have passed the exam this way, and only after receiving their license did they begin to actually learn the material.
Richard believes that it’s our responsibility to Elmer the new licensees and keep them interested and motivated to learn more.
The newletter article, “Recommended Reading”, from the March 10, 2011 issue of The Groundwire, courtesy of the Tyler Amateur Radio Club, is reproduced below: 

 

Recommended Reading

Frankly, I look upon the FCC’s current method of granting amateur radio licenses with considerable disdain. This is wrought not only because I’m “old school” (and proud of it!) but also because, in college, I saw many of my contemporaries get as good or better grades than I simply because they were as good or better “memorizers” than I was a “studier”. Typically, a day or two after an exam, they couldn’t recall even “D-level” recognition of the material much less any real working knowledge of same. I feel the current testing format encourages “cramming”, a.k.a. just memorizing questions and
answers long enough to score a passing grade on the tests.

Some of the statements I hear on the air today, both on repeaters and HF, only serve to bolster that opinion. For example: “I need to get a new antenna because the one I’m using doesn’t have enough SWRs.” (No, I’m not kidding!)

I don’t want anyone to be able to accuse any of my fellow TARC members of falling into that “crammer” category. Accordingly, I urge all to continue reading and studying about all the technical aspects of our shared hobby, especially those that interest them most, e.g. antennas, receivers, circuitry, power, grounding, etc. to get a good foundation into not only the “whats” (i.e. “crammer-level”) but also the “whys” and the “hows” (where understanding and application begins). To that end, I offer a few PDF documents as a good place to start to learn about a few of the aspects of building and properly operating a useful and safe shack. These short documents cover lightning protection, RF grounding, and the term “decibel” (dB).

(Thanks to Bob, AG5X, and Elaine, KF5CNN, co-editors of The Groundwire, for allowing us to reproduce their article here.)

16:34 Conclusion Check out the website, make a donation to the podcast, use Go Daddy for your web hosting, and click the Amazon link for your purchases. Send your feedback! Check out Linux in the Ham Shack, too. 

Email Richard at kb5jbv@gmail.com
Twitter: twitter.com/kb5jbv
Identica: http://identi.ca/kb5jbv
Friendfeed: http://friendfeed.com/kb5jbv
KB5JBV on D-Star via the NT5RN repeater.
Fan pages at Facebook for Resonant Frequency and Linux in the Ham Shack.

Closing theme “We Gotta Go” by David Henderson at Podsafe Audio.
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